Don't Look Up (2009)
Set in and around an abandoned film studio from another era, “Don’t Look Up” charts the unravelling sanity of a director and his crew when spirits from that era invade the film stock of the contemporary production and, in a few stark frames, open a horrifying window on a terrible curse from the past.
Genre: Horror
Director: Fruit Chan
Release Date: TBA 2009
Producers: Yoko Asakura,Brian Cox,Anant Singh
Actors: Kevin Corrigan,Henry Thomas,Daniela Sea,Zelda Williams,David Dayan Fisher,Lothaire Bluteau,Carmen Chaplin,Robert Towers,Reshad Strik,Elena Satine,Vitaliy Versace,Ajla Hodzic,Rachael Murphy,Jack Dimich,Alma Saraci,Ian Fisher,Alyssa Sutherland
             
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